Printing an image

Printing an image

People who follow me on Instagram know that I have a simple of rules to judge the quality of an image. It’s rarely the pure technical quality, such as ISO, shutter speed or aperture. More often it is that special feeling when you look at it and - to put that extra criticism into the equation - the answer to one simple question: would I actually hang this on my own wall? When combining all of those aspects nine out of ten images don’t make it to the finish line.

Although I always photograph in color, this rarely holds up in post production. The modern world simply has too much content and visual impulses. Photographers are canvassing the globe with their smartphones and there’re taken millions of images each day; Apple even advertises this in their award winning “Shot on iPhone” campaigns. Due to technology, some of them even come close to “Planet Earth-material”. How cool and beautiful they are: I find them too tense and therefore distracting to serve as interior decoration. Black and white has some kind of timelessness and peacefulness. And combined with my subject of choice, wildlife, these kind of images are clean and hold better in almost any interior.

Jochen van Dijk

When browsing for a company to print these images I came across the Germany based company Saal Digital. They provide a range of products, including fine art prints on baryta paper. It’s undoubtedly my paper of choice for fine art prints. Why? Well, without going in too much technical geekiness: the benefits include greater detail and definition, extended tonal range, some delicate texture and great archival properties. For short: monocolored prints on this material are, especially on a 50 x70 cm format, genuinely legit.

As I don’t want my images altered by other software I ordered using the direct online upload option. Sadly they don’t put this in the spotlight as much as the software they provide, as it is much easier to use. And more important: when not using the software app it supports TIFF-files. This means the possibility to upload (much) larger files with greater detail. The order process was straight, simple and incredibly rapid: within only 3 days I received my order. Nicely, securely packed and carefully rolled with some protective sheets in between the prints. 

These guys come highly recommended for quality and speed!

Tinderbox

Tinderbox

Over the years I've wasted so much time photographing alligators. "Tinderbox" illustrates that time and effort eventually pay off. This image is the result of dedication and lots of trial and error. The world doesn't need another image of an alligator from an airboat or - god forbid - one of those alligator farms. Those images are great to show back at home on your iPhone, but these artificial encounters are mostly hackneyed pulp.

Tinderbox

The sawgrass and proximity of only a few inches to this ancient predator change the whole dynamic. It brings a visceral sence of "Honey, I shrunk the kids"-perspective to the image with actually a selfie of me in her eye. This alone will make it stand the test of time. Only seconds after this image was made, she decided to release her full fiercefullness on - thankfully - my wide-angle lens.

The remote and monopod didn't survive... And I've probably never been more grateful with Nikon’s perfect equipment; I've got the teeth marks to show for it on my lens...

Jochen van Dijk
26/2/2017
Everglades, USA

Morning Commute

Morning Commute

"Morning Commute" illustrates why there’s no beter place in the world to be at 7 AM than Amboseli's dry lake. Amboseli is the best canvas in the world to work on and this composition shows why: an elephant family marching through the dusty plains with Kilimanjaro as a backdrop... It’s rather simple, yet surreal due to the magnificence of these animals.

This is emphatically demonstrated by this image. When this herd crossed the dry lands of Amboseli I knew this was a special moment. The use of space to create a distinct sense of vastness near these magnificent animals is typical for this remote place.Elephants have an amazing memory and they're up to live to 60 to 70 years. They're socially much more connected than even humans are these days. “Morning Commute” illustrates this powerfull unity.

Though the Serengeti and Mara are magnificent, Amboseli consists of just flat and raw terrain without any distracting backdrops. This elemental starkness suits my clean style of photography.

Jochen van Dijk
01/10/2016
Amboseli, Kenya